Vince Lombardi Trophy image on football stadium during Super Bowl
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4 Fascinating Things You Most Likely Didn’t Know About the Super Bowl

With Super Bowl LV just around the corner on Feb. 7, 2021, we thought it would be a great idea to delve deep into the archives of the NFL to learn more about the league’s most important game of the year.

Aside from the highly-anticipated Super Bowl commercials (let’s be honest, they’re absolutely dreadful these days), there’s a lot that goes into making the game run smoothly while also ensuring those in attendance and watching at home are entertained during the entirety of the “big game.”

Below is a list of four fascinating facts you most likely didn’t know about the Super Bowl. If you were aware of these interesting tidbits, then you may want to consider picking up a few more hobbies;)

The Intricacies of the Super Bowl Football

There are exactly 25 steps to making every NFL football used in the Super Bowl each year. Every one of these steps is completed by hand with the aid of machines at the Wilson Football Factory in Ada, Ohio.

The words “Commissioner,” “Wilson” and, “Made in the U.S.A.” are imprinted on every single football used during the game. It’s been this way since the inception of the first Super Bowl.

Additionally, each team playing in the Super Bowl is given 108 footballs — 54 for practice and 54 for use in the actual game. During a typical Super Bowl, 120 footballs are used, with the additional 12 balls used only for kicking plays.

Perks For Players And Guests

One of the perks of every player in the Super Bowl is that they get to ride around in style. During the week leading up to the biggest game of the season, players are given a loaner car for their own personal use.

Former Indianapolis Colts cornerback Marlin Jackson said he drove a Cadillac Escalade the week leading up to Super Bowl XLI. Perhaps the only thing he was responsible for was putting fuel in the gas-guzzler, something an NFL player can certainly afford.

Jackson also said the players weren’t the only ones who enjoyed the perks of attending the Super Bowl. “Family and friends enjoy the weekend with hotel stays, luxury vehicle loans, and exclusive events,” he said. “They also have the opportunity to attend practice the day before the game…”

Halftime at the Super Bowl

During halftime of a typical football game, players use the respite to make offensive and defensive adjustments as well as work out any muscle kinks, including cramps or soreness.

Because of the Super Bowl Halftime Show, the time between the end of the second quarter and the start of the third is doubled. As a result, players sit back and enjoy some R&R for about 20 minutes before beginning their exercises in preparation for the second half.

Speaking of the Halftime Show, did you know that the performers, including those headlining the event, don’t get paid a single dime for their services? The exposure these artists get, however, is just as important for their careers.

The Coveted Super Bowl Ticket

In what comes as a surprise to no one, tickets to the Super Bowl come with a massive price tag. The average cost of Super Bowl L tickets in 2016 sat around $4,700 a piece.

Compare this price to the tickets for the first Super Bowl in 1967, which cost a measly $6. That’s less than a beer by today’s standards!

Additionally, the Super Bowl only issues and accepts paper tickets. In an effort to curb ticket fraud, e-tickets are neither sold nor accepted at the entrance gate. Hold on to those tickets tightly, folks!

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